Natural Disaster Recovery

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RRR Program

Repair, Restore, Renew 2011 Flood and Cyclone Recovery
2013 bushfire recovery - currently raising funds

 
 

                         

Disaster strikes and recovery begins…

When disaster strikes, hearts and pockets open to help people and communities recover. Making sure those funds are used well and wisely to aid rural and regional communities’ recovery for the long term is a special service offered by the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR).

Read  about how some affected communities have recovered and how they've worked with FRRR

FRRR works to assist communities impacted by declared natural disasters. Philanthropy can assist the recovery process in a number of ways and is best placed to do so once the short-term recovery work has been completed by federal and state governments.

Long after the media has moved on and initial grants and emergency assistance are dispensed in disaster-struck areas, gaps in community need emerge. Community recovery takes time to conduct planning and ensure that social and physical infrastructure
is appropriate, sustainable and meets the future needs of the community. FRRR is an independent advocate that recognises the need for support in the medium to long term recovery.

FRRR’s Approach - Natural Disaster Response Framework

FRRR has developed a Natural Disaster Response Framework that supports the medium to long term recovery of rural and regional communities. FRRR has responded to a range of disaster events across rural and regional communities over the last ten years, including Cylcone Larry, 2008 Emerald & Mackay Floods, the 2009 Victorian Bushfires, and 2011 floods and cyclones in Victoria, NSW and Queensland.

Subsequently FRRR has developed a multi-level collaborative philanthropic response designed to work in partnership with funding partners and the community through the medium to long term recovery process. The aim is to work under a single philanthropic banner. By working in this manner it attempts to avoid replication of philanthropic effort and resources and fill the gaps as only philanthropy can.

There are four main elements to FRRR’s Disaster Recovery Response:  

These four elements are inter-connected and operate together to form a holistic response to recovery:

1. Granting Programs

Phase 1: Repair-Restore - Renew (RRR) Grants Program

Flexible, accessible and adaptable community grants program will be implemented once the community planning and engagement process has commenced as part of the medium to long term response.

Grants will be available to support a diverse range of projects including minor infrastructure, arts, mental health, volunteer fatigue, training, leadership, resilience, communication and mitigation.

RRR is a collaborative partnership based grants program. Donations to this program have come from the philanthropic and corporate sectors, as well as generous individuals. Where a specific interest or region is required FRRR has the capacity to tailor a specific element of the RRR Program to meet the needs of the donor.

Phase 2: Support and Resilience Grants Programs

In our experience, after most repairs are done on community infrastructure, and the initial 'processing' of the disaster has happened, people realise they are very tired. They aren't sure how to keep going, and often they feel like everyone has forgotten them. In this phase, we focus on funding capacity building programs, and building community resilience.

For example, for those communities affected by the 2009 Victorian bushfires, we are running two programs:

STEPS (Skills, Training, Engagement and Practical Support) and is a grant program focused on relieving volunteer fatigue and assisting the development of new leaders within disaster recovering communities. Donations to this program have come from government, the philanthropic and corporate sectors.

GR&W (Grants for Resilience & Wellness) is a longer term grant program targeting health and wellbeing and community resilience. This program was funded via the Victorian Bushfire Appeal Fund.

2. Clearing house role

FRRR will attempt to act as a clearing house for projects on behalf of the philanthropic sector to encourage the continuation of a collaborative response.

3. Leverage programs

FRRR will work collaboratively with other funding bodies to jointly refer and exchange projects to ensure the most effective use of available funds.

4. FRRR Regional and Project Specific Donation Accounts

These accounts provides FRRR with the ability to assure philanthropic bodies, corporates, organisations or communities that wish to, or have, raised funds to give into a specific community or region or for a specific purpose.

How does it help devastated communities?

Long after the media has moved on and initial grants are dispensed in disaster-struck areas, gaps in community need emerge. Community recovery takes time to conduct planning and ensure that social and physical infrastructure is appropriate, sustainable and meets the future needs of the community. FRRR is an independent advocate, that recognises the need for support in the medium to long term recovery.

To learn more about FRRR's view on how this can work, read about our seven principles of disaster recovery granting.

Who can donate and partner?

This program will take you or your company, fund, foundation, trust or organisation right to the heart of recovery, linking you with areas that are disaster declared that you would like to support.

Individuals, families, private and public ancillary funds, family trusts, corporate entities and foundations can all support the natural disaster recovery program.

A special tax law means FRRR can deliver funds on behalf of provate ancillary funds and family trusts to not-for-profit organisations with and without deductible gift recipient (DGR) status, with resultant tax benefits for donors.

Getting started

Contact the FRRR CEO on 1800 170 020, or donate online.  FRRR is available to deliver presentations on this program to philanthropists and corporate fund managers.